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The University of Kentucky College of Fine Arts

Musicology & Ethnomusicology

Image of students playing authentic and ornate instruments in the Balinese Gamelan EnsembleThe Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology of the UK School of Music offers a superior education in musicology with its diverse faculty of scholars, its dual emphasis on traditional research and creative explorations in the field, its focus on collaborations between scholarship and performance, and its access to the extensive collections housed in the Lucille Little Fine Arts Library and the John Jacob Niles Center for American Music. The Musicology and Ethnomusicology Division is presently made up of seven full-time faculty and one part-time instructor, whose specialties range from the Medieval period to contemporary music, from chant and opera to fiddle tunes, folk songs, and Korean drumming, employing a wide variety of methodological approaches. The expertise of several faculty members reinforces the School of Music’s designated strengths in Opera/Vocal Music and American Music.

The School of Music offers two degrees in Musicology/Ethnomusicology: an M.A. and a combined M.A./Ph.D. The UK School of Music does not offer an undergraduate degree in musicology or music history, however there is a large selection of undergraduate course for majors and non-majors. Undergraduate students who plan to study musicology at the graduate level might wish to consider the B.A. degree in music, since it offers the most opportunity for advanced study, but those with other undergraduate music degrees can also pursue graduate study in the field.

Degree Tracks

See the School of Music Auditions & Admissions page for more information on applications and exams.

Combined M.A./PhD

The First Two Years

The first two years of study provide training in the practice and methodology of musicology and ethnomusicology. A minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit is required during the first two years of graduate study.

Second-Year Review, Examinations, and Research Paper

During the second year of graduate study the student will be expected to:

  • Take an examination designed to test the student's knowledge, including both repertoire and scholarly literature, of selected topics, announced in advance (see instructions for the Common Examinations on the School of Music DGS webpage) in European and American music and in ethnomusicology, and of music theory. This will include a four-hour exam in general music history, with questions directed toward PhD candidates in musicology/ethnomusicology that are reflective of scholarly study and that include ethnomusicological topics (these questions will differ somewhat from those for DMA candidates); it will also include a four-hour exam in music theory. Under normal circumstances, these exams should be taken near the beginning of the Spring semester in the second year of study. Students who are exempted from the first year of study through an approved previous M.A. degree will take these exams during the Spring semester of their first year of study.
  • Write a paper on a topic of the student’s choice, and with approval of the student’s advisor. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the student’s ability to conduct research, display lucid and articulate writing, and to successfully negotiate the process of revision under the supervision of the advisor or another faculty member. This second-year paper should explain and review a selected topic in musicology or ethnomusicology, survey and evaluate the available literature on the topic, and identify lines of inquiry which remain to be pursued. The recommended length for this paper is 20-30 pages of prose, in addition to the bibliography, with appendices and musical examples as needed. The completed paper should be submitted to the student’s advisor both electronically and in hard copy.
    • Notes: If the paper is to be a revision of a previously submitted seminar paper, this revision should be done with the consent of the original instructor (as well as the student’s advisor), and the original instructor should supervise the revision process.

The departmental evaluation of all students in the second year is based on course work completed to date, the paper, the results of the preliminary exam, and the student's prospects for continued success in the field. The department's judgment is a collective one. If the evaluation is favorable, the student may continue in the Ph.D. program. If a student has not successfully fulfilled the requirements of the second-year review, but has performed adequately in other respects, he or she will, upon completion of 36 credits of coursework, be awarded a terminal master's degree.

A student who completed a thesis as part of a previous master’s degree in musicology or ethnomusicology may submit this in lieu of the paper as described above.
The process:

  1. The student and advisor agree on a paper topic, obtaining the agreement of the original professor if this is to be a revision of a previously submitted paper. If the proposed paper would not fit the basic description above, consent should be obtained from the entire Musicology and Ethnomusicology faculty before proceeding.
  2. The student writes and revises the paper under the supervision of the advisor and/or the instructor of course for which the paper was originally submitted. The advisor and one other faculty member, either the other instructor as referred to above, or another member of the student’s advisory committee, must agree that the paper is acceptable. Both of these faculty members should be have the opportunity to request revisions.
  3. When the two primary faculty members agree that the paper is acceptable, it should be circulated to the entire Division faculty for their consent. Any faculty member may indicate to the advisor that further revisions would be necessary for his or her approval, but if a majority are satisfied, such revisions will not be required (although they should be passed on to the student in any case as suggested improvements).
  4. In the case of a submission of a musicology master’s thesis submission, a copy of the thesis should be submitted to the Chair of the Graduate Advisory Committee for Approval.

The Third Year

During the third year, students continue to be enrolled full-time in classes. These should include MUS 702 each semester, MUS 703 if not taken previously, and MUS 711 if offered. The remainder of the coursework should consist of independent study with the advisor or other faculty members in preparation for the dissertation prospectus and special area examinations, and other courses as recommended by the student’s Advisory Committee.

Third-Year Special Area Comprehensive
Examinations and Thesis Prospectus Defense

Third-Year students in the Ph.D. program in musicology and ethnomusicology take a written four-hour special area examination dedicated to preparing them for the broad area of context and more specialized area of focus for their thesis. Following completion of the written examination, the student will undertake an oral examination based on these same topic areas. The Special Area Examination is usually taken near the end of the Spring semester of the third year. It is recommended that in the preceding Fall semester and in the Spring semester the student enroll in independent study classes with the advisor or other member of the advisory committee to prepare for the examination and the thesis prospectus (see below). The student shall schedule the oral examination through the Graduate School web site and must include all members of the graduate advisory committee. This is the examination recognized by the Graduate School as the “Comprehensive Exam.” Following successful completion of these exams, the student shall be admitted to Ph.D. Candidacy.

The qualifying examinations will consist of a special field examination in musicology or ethnomusicology, the general sense and limits of which have been discussed in advance with the prospective dissertation advisor and the student’s advisory committee and approved by graduate faculty members of the Division. The special field should be defined broadly enough to demonstrate that the student has sufficient preparation both to write the proposed dissertation and to teach in a recognized area of musicological scholarship, without being so broad as to make in-depth knowledge of the field impractical. In most cases, the student and advisor will also agree on a more focused area within the special field which will require more intense and complete preparation. The written examination shall be four hours long, to be followed by a two hour examination which may, under specific circumstances, also incorporate the defense of the thesis prospectus.

Preparation for the Special Area Examination topics should also serve as preparation for crafting the Thesis Prospectus, a document of approximately 25 pages (excluding bibliography) that presents the background, thesis statement, significance of the study, delimitation of scope, methodology, review of literature, chapter summary, and working bibliography.  When completed, the thesis prospectus should be circulated to the committee prior to a scheduled oral defense of the thesis prospectus before the entire graduate advisory committee.

Generally, the oral exam for the Special Area Examination and the Thesis Prospectus Defense will be scheduled for two separate two-hour long events. However, if a completed thesis prospectus has been  circulated to the committee at least a week in advance and if the entire  graduate advisory committee consents, the oral exam and the thesis prospectus defense may be integrated and addressed in a single meeting to be scheduled for a minimum of 2 1Ž2 hours. It is essential that both the oral examination and the prospectus defense be allotted a minimum of one hour each. At least the first hour must be devoted to the oral examination. If at that point, the committee is satisfied and votes to pass the student, the defense of the prospectus may begin. If more time is needed for the oral exam, that may continue for the full two hours, in which case the prospectus defense will have to be rescheduled for a later date.

The Dissertation

As soon as possible after the successful completion of Qualifying Examinations, the student should submit a dissertation proposal to his/her Advisory Committee. The student will defend this proposal at a meeting of the committee, and is expected to submit any required revisions within two months.

The dissertation itself will meet all the requirements of the University of Kentucky Graduate School, and will be defended following the usual Final Examination procedures.

Course Requirements

For a typical three-year course plan, click here.

MUS 618 - Research Methods 3
MUS 703 - Proseminar in Musicological Methods 3
MUS 700 - Medieval and Renaissance Notation 3
MUS 702 - Seminar in Musicology (variable topics)* 12-18
MUS 710 - Introduction to Ethnomusicology 3
MUS 711 - Seminar in Ethnomusicology (variable topics) 3-6
Advanced Music Theory (not including MUS 578) 9
Directed electives (including independent study) 9-18
Total 54

*MUS 702 should be taken every semester prior to passing the qualifying exam. To accommodate those with a prior Master’s who entered as second year students, 12 credits are required at minimum but 18 credits is the expectation for all other students. Auditing or exemption will be considered by committee on a case by case basis.

Note: All Ph.D. students are required to take a total of 54 credits.Students entering the program with a Master’s degree in musicology and who are admitted as second year students can graduate with 36 hours.  Entering students who would like to be considered as a second year with a previous Master’s degree in musicology must receive approval to do so from their Advisor and Advisory committee in their first semester and determine coursework based upon the evaluation of courses taken in the previous degree.

Master of Arts Single Track

Applicants for the M.A. in Musicology must meet entrance requirements of the Graduate School and the School of Music and must demonstrate strengths in music history and theory as well as skills in clear and persuasive writing. Students are required to submit a sample of their research and writing in the form of a research paper. Some background in musical performance is also expected.

Coursework

The M.A. usually requires three semesters of full-time coursework. All students in this program must take MUS 618 – Research Methods in the first fall semester they are enrolled. Students in this program usually take four musicology courses, selected from among graduate offerings at the 600 and 700 level (which may include doctoral seminars). In addition, they take two or three advanced courses in music theory and analysis.

Foreign Language

All students in the M.A. program must demonstrate reading knowledge of one foreign language. This is usually French or German, but may be another language appropriate to the students’ research interests. The Graduate School offers reading knowledge courses in French, German, and Spanish.

Thesis

All students in the M.A. program must complete a Masters Thesis, which must consist of original work in the field of musicology.

Final Examination

Upon completion of the thesis, students sit for a Final Examination (administered by a committee consisting of the student’s advisor, another musicology faculty member, and a faculty member in music theory). This oral examination consists primarily of a defense of the thesis, but also covers aspects of music history and theory.

Advising Policy

1) The Separate M.A. Program

The Director of Graduate Studies in association with the Coordinator of the Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology will serve as the advisor and approve the student’s course schedule for the first semester.

The second semester the Division Coordinator will assign an advisor drawn from the Division in consultation with the student. That advisor will serve until the student chooses a Chair and Advisory Committee to guide him/her through the thesis process. The Chair will serve as the primary advisor from that point to the conclusion of the degree. The student may also choose the Chair of the Graduate Advisory Committee in the second semester. In this case, the chair continues to guide the student’s master’s work until its conclusion.

2) The Combined M.A./Ph.D. Program

The Director of Graduate Studies in association with the Coordinator of the Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology will serve as the advisor and approve the student’s course schedule for the first semester.

The second semester the Division Coordinator will assign an advisor drawn from the Division in consultation with the student. That advisor will serve until the student successfully completes the 2nd Year examinations.

Immediately upon passing the 2nd year examinations, the student will form the Graduate Advisory Committee. The student should consult with his/her advisor in selecting members of the committee, and is responsible for completing the “Request to form a Graduate Advisory Committee” form on-line.

The Graduate Advisory Committee shall contain three full-time members of the Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology (one of whom will serve as chair, and a second of which may be designated as co-chair) as well as a full time member of the Division of Theory and Composition. At this point, the committee does not need to also include the outside member. When a thesis direction is chosen, an outside member is chosen and the full Graduate Advisory Committee is formally submitted to the Graduate School through the appropriate on-line form. At this point, the student may also change the membership of the committee if the thesis topic makes this appropriate. The composition of the committee must also satisfy Graduate School policy concerning full and associate graduate status for committee members.

The full Graduate Advisory Committee (five members) shall have an introductory meeting when the committee is first formally convened. Residency, language, research methods, and other requirements shall be considered. Minutes documenting the meeting shall be circulated to the student and the committee, and a copy shall be placed in the file in the Office of Student Affairs.

After the initial meeting, the Graduate Advisory Committee shall meet at least once each year to provide guidance for the student’s academic progress. Additional members of the Division may be invited to the meeting in order to provide additional perspective as necessary.

The Graduate Advisory Committee shall be convened for the oral examination following the written qualifying examinations.

The Graduate Advisory Committee shall be convened for the Prospectus Defense. Since this is an “internal” requirement, it is necessary for only the “core” committee to be present, though it is desirable that the full committee be present.

The Graduate Advisory shall meet a final time at the thesis defense.

3) Student entering the “Continuous” (Blended) program and already possessing a Master’s degree.

The Director of Graduate Studies in association with the Coordinator of the Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology will serve as the advisor and approve the student’s course schedule for the first semester.

Immediately upon passing the 2nd year examinations, the student will form the Graduate Advisory Committee. (The exams will be taken during the 1st semester). The student should consult with his/her advisor in selecting members of the committee, and is responsible for completing the “Request to form a Graduate Advisory Committee” form on-line.

The Graduate Advisory Committee shall contain three full-time members of the Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology (one of whom will serve as chair, and a second of which may be designated as co-chair) as well as a full time member of the Division of Theory and Composition. At this point, the committee does not need to also include the outside member. When a thesis direction is chosen, an outside member is chosen and the full Graduate Advisory Committee is formally submitted to the Graduate School through the appropriate on-line form. At this point, the student may also change the membership of the committee if the thesis topic makes this appropriate. The composition of the committee must also satisfy Graduate School policy concerning full and associate graduate status for committee members.

The full Graduate Advisory Committee (five members) shall have an introductory meeting when the committee is first formally convened. Residency, language, research methods, and other requirements shall be considered. Minutes documenting the meeting shall be circulated to the student and the committee, and a copy shall be placed in the file in the Office of Student Affairs.

After the initial meeting, the Graduate Advisory Committee shall meet at least once each year to provide guidance for the student’s academic progress. Additional members of the Division may be invited to the meeting in order to provide additional perspective as necessary.

The Graduate Advisory Committee shall be convened for the oral examination following the written qualifying examinations.

The Graduate Advisory Committee shall be convened for the Prospectus Defense. Since this is an “internal” requirement, it is necessary for only the “core” committee to be present, though it is desirable that the full committee be present.

The Graduate Advisory shall meet a final time at the thesis defense.

Student Resources

Core Literacy List

Academic Checklists:

Temporary Committee Form

Students should have their Doctoral Advisory Committee in place before taking the Common Exams. However, because of the nature of the "Blended" MA/Ph.D. Program, it is too early to form the full graduate advisory committee complete with an outside member.  Therefore, a temporary graduate committee should be formed consisting of the chair, two musicologists/ethnomusicologists, and a theorist. The form, attached in PDF format, should be downloaded, completed, signed, and placed in the student's file in the Office of the Director of Graduate Studies. Following General Comprehensive Examinations (usually in the spring of the second year) it is usually appropriate to form the full graduate advisory committee. This is accomplished by completing the online form at the Graduate School website

Financial Support

Teaching Assistantships

We strongly believe that students are best prepared for an academic career by teaching under the supervision of an experienced professor. Therefore, the bulk of financial support for graduate students in musicology is through assistantships. The majority of entering Ph.D. students are offered full assistantships renewable for a total of three years. These assistantships carry an initial stipend of about $10,000, increasing each year to about $11,000 by the third year, plus full tuition (students must, however, pay some fees). For the first two years, each Teaching Assistant is usually assigned two sections (45 students each) of Introduction to Music for non-majors, for which they are fully responsible (with the exception of textbook selection, which is done for all sections together). In the third year, Teaching Assistants may be assigned other history courses for non-majors, such as Symphonic Music, Vocal Music, History of Jazz, or American Music. We are not usually able to award Teaching Assistantships to students in the M.A. program.  Click here to read more about Musicology Funding Policies.

University Fellowships

Entering and returning graduate students at either the M.A. or Ph.D. level are eligible to apply for several non-servivce fellowships offered by the Graduate School; some of these are competitive campus-wide (including a Dissertation Year Fellowship), and others are designated for students in the School of Music.  For application information, see UK Graduate Scholarships and Financial Assistance.

The Rey M. Longyear Dissertation Fellowship

Each year, one student with an approved Ph.D. dissertation proposal will be awarded a one-year non-service fellowship of $11,000 for research and writing of the dissertation. Students should indicate their interest, in writing, to the Coordinator of the Division of Musicology by March 15.

Travel and Research Funding

Graduate students at either the M.A. or Ph.D. level may apply for research and travel support through the Rey M. Longyear Musicology Research and Travel Fund. This provides reimbursement for dissertation and thesis research and for travel to professional meetings. Students are also eligible for support from the Graduate School and from the Friends of the U.K. School of Music (online webform).

University of Kentucky Libraries

PhD Dissertations in Progress

Scott Buzza
​(Adjunct Faculty, Xavier University)
The Vespers Psalms of Baldassare Galuppi
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
Abstract

Kathryn L. Caton
Opera Experiments and Social Transformation
in the Age of Digital Technology: Shifting Stages, Media, and Audiences

(research director: Diana Hallman)
Abstract

Erin Fulton
Vestry Music and Vestry Meetings in New England, 1841–1848
(research director: Ron Pen)
Abstract

Thomas Hyder
Franz Liszt and the Concept of Genius: Génie oblige and Artistic Promotion
(research director: Ben Arnold)

Tanner Jones
Performing Agency and Change Through Jeju Shaman Ritual
(research directors: Donna Kwon and Ron Pen)
Abstract

Kaylina Madison
A Comprehensive Investigation of Black Sacred Music,
the Spiritual, and John Wesley Work III
(research director: Ron Pen)
Abstract

Nathan Miller
(Assistant Professor, Asbury University)
Inside Outside: The Cultural Paradox of Salvation Army Brass Bands
in America During the Age of Nationalism

(research director: Ron Pen)
Abstract

Megan Murph
Max Neuhaus, R. Murray Schafer, and the Challenges with Noise
(research directors: Donna Kwon and Ron Pen)
Abstract

Rebecca O'Brien
When the Inhuman Becomes Human: 
An Examination of the Musical Portrayal of the Robot in 21st-century Science Fiction Cinema 
through an Analysis of the Film Scores of  
AutomataEx Machina, and The Machine
(research director: Ron Pen)
Abstract

Laura Pita
The Contribution of Teresa Carreño’s Performances and Compositions 
to American Concert Life
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
Abstract

Ysabel Sarte
Una música de pajaritos y angeles:  Music and the Female Mystics of Early Modern Spain
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
Abstract

Jennifer Tullmann 
The Remaking of Lulu on Stage: Transformations of Character, Music, and Context
(research director: Diana Hallman)
Abstract

PhD Alum Dissertations

Links go to Abstracts. Full text dissertations available where noted.

Jeffrey Daniel Jones
Frank Zappa and his Conception of Civilization Phaze III
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2018
[Complete Dissertation]

Todd Jones
(Assistant Professor, Bob Jones University)
The Relationship Between Lowell Mason and
the Boston Handel and Haydn Society, 1815-1827

(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2017
[Complete Dissertation]

Christopher Little
Beyond England's "Green and Pleasant Land":
English Musical Romantics Alongside the Musical Renaissance

(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2016
[Complete Dissertation]

John Michael McCluskey
(Assistant Professor, Shorter University)
Music as Narrative in American College Football
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2016
[Complete Dissertation]

Erin Walker
(Lecturer in World Music, The University of Kentucky)
The Scottish Pipe Band in North America: Tradition, Transformation, and Transnational Identity
(research director: Diana Hallman)
Ph.D. 2015
[Complete Dissertation]

Alicia Ruth Massie-Legg
(Lecturer in Music, Maryville College)
Zilphia Horton, a Voice for Change
(research directors: Ron Pen and Jonathan Glixon)
Ph.D. 2014
[Complete Dissertation]

César Leal 
(Assistant Professor and Orchestra Director, Sewanee: The University of the South)
Re-Thinking Paris: A New Vision of Parisian Cultural Life from 1880 to 1913
from the Perspective of Gabriel Astruc

(research directors: Jonathan Glixon and Diana Hallman)
Ph.D. 2014
[Complete Dissertation]

Erica Rumbley
(Indiana University Kokomo)
From Piano Girl to Professional: The Changing Form of Music Instruction
at the Nashville Female Academy and the Ward-Belmont School, 1816-1930

(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2014
[Complete Dissertation]

Ann Glazer Niren
(Adjunct Lecturer, Indiana University Southeast)
The Influence of Solomon Braslavsky and Congregation Mishkan Tefila on Leonard Bernstein
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2013

Nikos Pappas
Patterns in the Sacred Musical Culture of the American South and West (1760-1860)
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2013
[Complete Dissertation]

Eric Strother
(Instructor, Anderson University)
Unlocking the Paradox of Christian Metal Music
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2013
[Complete Dissertation]

Yawen Ludden
(Instructor, Georgia Gwinnett College)
China’s Musical Revolution: from Beijing Opera to Yangbanxi
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
Ph.D. 2013
[Complete Dissertation]

Larry Nelson
(Associate Professor, Eastern Kentucky University)
The Social and Musical Construction o f the Jam Session in Jazz
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2011

Angela Hammond
Color Me Country: Commercial Country Music and Whiteness
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2011

Marshal Gaioso Pinto
(Professor, Federal Institute of Education, Science, and Technology of Goiás, Brazil)
Sacred Music in Goiás (1737-1936)
and Balthasar de Freitas’s Collection

(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
Ph.D. 2010

Dennis Davis
(Professor, Eastern Kentucky University)
Humor, Structure, and Methodology in Selected Works by Peter Schickele
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2010

Kevin Kehrberg
(Professor of Music, Warren Wilson College)
“I’ll Fly Away”: The Music and Career of Albert E. Brumley
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2010
[Complete Dissertation]

Tedrin Blair Lindsay
(Lecturer and vocal coach, University of Kentucky)
The Development of a Core Repertoire of American Operas 
at New York City Opera under Julius Rudel, 1957-1979 

(research director: Diana R. Hallman)
Ph.D. 2009

Paige Clark Lush
(Assistant Professor, McHenry County College)
Music and Identity in Circuit Chautauqua: 1904-1932
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 2009
[Complete Dissertation]

Heidy Kiepper Ximenes
The Carnivals of Salvador
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
Ph.D. 2008

Raleigh K. Dailey
(Associate Professor, University of Kentucky)
Folklore, Composition, and Free Jazz:
The Life and Music of John Carter

(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D 2007

Bonnie Cutsforth-Huber
(Associate Professor, Penn State Altoona)
The Operas of William Grant Still
(research directors: Ron Pen and Diana R. Hallman)
Ph.D. 2004

James A. Bates
(Associate Professor and Director of Orchestral Activities, Otterbein College)
Music for the Viola da Gamba in Italy 1580-1650
(research director: John Ashworth, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 2002

David B. Beverly 
John Adams’s Opera The Death of Klinghoffer
(research director: Jean Christensen, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 2002

Nancy Jane McKenney
(Retired Librarian, Eastern Kentucky University)
The Chamber Music of Miklós Rózsa
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
Ph.D. 2002

John W. Kays
(Lecturer, University of Louisville)
Life and Works of Chinary Ung
(research director: Jean Christensen, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 2000

Allen Bruce Mullinax
Musicological Hermeneutics and the Musical Humanism of Christoph Bernhard
(research director: Karl-Werner Guempel, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 1998

Marc Rice
(Professor, Truman State University)
The Bennie Moten Orchestra 1918-1935: A Kansas City Jazz Ensemble and Its African American Audience
(research director: Jean Christensen, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 1998

Kristen Kelle Stauffer (1966-2014)
(Professor, Oklahoma Baptist University)
Spirit of the Times: Music Criticism as an Exegesis of Public Opinion and History of Reception
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 1998

Phillipa Edith Burgess
(Prestige Music Studios, Powell, OH)
An Examination of Function, Venue, and Sources in the Repertoire of Mid-Nineteenth-Century American Brass Bands
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 1997

 Pamela Elizabeth Theis Ivezic
Alexander Sergeyevich Dargomyzhsky 1813-1869: A Study of His Solo Vocal Works
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
Ph.D. 1997

John P. Karr
(Associate Professor, California State University, Fresno)
The Psalms of Siena MS K.I.2: Evidence on the Origins of Falsobordone
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
Ph.D. 1997

Paul Konye
(Associate Professor, Siena College)
Twentieth-Century Nigerian Art Music:
Social, Political, and Cultural Factors Involved in Its Evolution and Practice

(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 1997

Camille Crunelle Hill
(Elizabethtown Community and Technical College)
The Synthesis of Messiaen’s Musical Language in His Opera Saint François d’Assise
(research director: Jean Christensen, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 1996

Karen Lea Carter-Schwendler
Traditional Background, Contemporary Context: The Music and Activities of Jean Ritchie to 1977
(research director: Ron Pen)
Ph.D. 1995

Susan Cotton Perry
The Solo Organ and Harmonium Works of Camille Saint-Saëns: A Chronological Analysis
(research director: Rey M. Longyear)
Ph.D. 1994

Theodore L. Gentry
(Director of Music and Organist, Tates Creek Presbyterian Church, Lexington, KY)
Emblems of Love and Death in Italian Realist Opera: 1890-1914
(research director: Rey M. Longyear)
Ph.D. 1992

Ian David Pearson
(Professor, Winthrop University)
Johann Mattheson’s Das forschende Orchestre: The Influence of Early Modern Philosophy on an Eighteenth-Century Theorist
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
Ph.D. 1992

Alexander Thomas Simpson, Jr.
(Associate Professor, Bellarmine University)
Opera on Film: A Study of the History and the Aesthetic Principles and Conflicts of a Hybrid Genre
(research director: Robert Lamar Weaver, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 1990

Alice Hudnall Cash
Wanda Landowska and the Revival of the Harpsichord: A Reassessment
(research director: Robert Lamar Weaver, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 1990

Margaret Elizabeth Doutt
(Librarian {retired}, Eastern Kentucky University)
The Concertos of Jan Ladislav Dussek (1760-1812)
(research director: Rey M. Longyear)
Ph.D. 1989

Christine Dee Smith
André Campra’s Idomenée: A Study of Its Structural Components and a Critical Edition of the Work
(research directors: Rey M. Longyear and Jonathan Glixon)
Ph.D. 1988

Deborah Carlton Loftis
(Adjunct Faculty, Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond)
Big Singing Day in Benton, Kentucky: A Study of the History, Ethnic Identity, and usical Style of Southern Harmony Singers
research director: Robert Lamar Weaver, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 1987

Ronald A. Pen
(Professor Emeritus, University of Kentucky)
The Biography and Works of John Jacob Niles
(research director: Donald Ivey and Jonathan Glixon)
Ph.D. 1987

John William Schuster-Craig
(Professor, Grand Valley State University)
Compositional Procedure in Selected Works of Clement Pépin (b.1926)
(research director: Jean Christensen, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 1987

Cecil Benjamin Arnold,  Jr.
(Professor, University of Kentucky)
War, Peace, and the Apocalypse in Art Music Since World War II
(research director: Rey M. Longyear)
Ph.D. 1986

Jeanne Belfy
(Professor, Boise State University)
The Commissioning Project of the Louisville Orchestra, 1948-1958: A Study of the History and Music
(research director: Robert Lamarr Weaver, University of Louisville)
Ph.D. 1986

Allan Benedict Ho
(Professor, Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville)
The Late-Romantic Piano Concerto Finale: A Stylistic and Structural Analysis
(research director: Rey M. Longyear)
Ph.D. 1985

Metro John Voloshin
(Music Librarian, Boston Public Library)
The Secular Cantatas of Nicolas Bernier
(research director: Wesley Morgan)
Ph.D. 1984

Peter Alan Munstedt
(Music Librarian, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
John Playford, Music Publisher: A Bibliographic Catalogue
(research director: Wesley Morgan)
Ph.D. 1983

Carol Lynelle Quin
Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel: Her Contributions to Nineteenth-Century Musical Life
(research director: Rey M. Longyear)
Ph.D. 1981

In Soon Chi
(Librarian (retired), University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center )
A Comparative Study of the Mid-Sixteenth-Century Motet in Southern France: Pierre Cadéac and Guillaume Le Heurteur
(research director: Rey M. Longyear)
Ph.D. 1980

Kristine Karen Forney
(Professor, California State University, Long Beach)
Tielman Susato, Sixteenth-Century Music Printer: An Archival and Typographical Investigation
(research director: Wesley Morgan)
Ph.D. 1978

Recent MA Theses

Ross Whitaker
The Joke That Everybody Recognizes Now: An Analysis of Frank Zappa's “Louie Louie” Borrowings
(research director: Ron Pen)
M.A. 2013

Jeffrey Jones
The Lapi Collection: Early Nineteenth-Century Italian Music 
at the University of Louisville Music Library
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
M.A. 2010

Dean McCleese
From Hope-Jones to the Pizza Parlor: The Development of the Modern Theatre Organ Style
(research director: Ron Pen)
M.A. 2010

Erica Rumbley
Louis Moreau Gottschalk and his Patriotic Tours during the American Civil War (1862-65)
(research director: Ron Pen)
M.A. 2008

Erica Argyropoulos
Bernstein at Brandeis: A Study of Leonard Bernstein’s Collaboration with Brandeis University, 1951-1955
(research director: Ron Pen)
M.A. 2005

Kevin Kehrberg
Original Gospel Quartet Music Recorded by Bill Monroe
(research director: Ron Pen)
M.A. 2005

Tracie Lynette Scarbrough
Self-Quotation in “The Minstrel’s Catch” of Anthony Philip Heinrich (1781-1861)
(research director: Diana R. Hallman)
M.A. 2005

Reed David
Jazz Influence in Two Concertos of Aaron Copland
(research director: Ron Pen)
M.A. 2004

Sunryoung Lee
The Characteristics of Style Galant as Found in the Keyboard Sonatas, Op. 5, No. 1-5 by Johann Christian Bach
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
M.A. 2000

Jennifer Cecile King
A Fantasia of Sound: A Study of the Musical Editing and Animation in Walt Disney’s 1940 Film
(research director: Ron Pen)
 M.A. 1999

Hannah Katherine Kirsch
La vida breve: The First Spanish Opera
(research director: Jonathan Glixon)
 M.A. 1996

Elizabeth Sohler
The Influence of Gullah Culture on the Opera Porgy and Bess
(research director: Ron Pen)
M.A. 1995

Lectures & Colloquia

The Rey M. Longyear Lecture Series is funded by a generous gift from Mrs. Katherine Longyear. Guest lectures and colloquia are sponsored by the Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology and by FOCUS: the University of Kentucky Music Graduate Students Association.

Unless otherwise noted, all events take place on Friday afternoons, 3:30-5PM in the NILES GALLERY of the John Jacob Niles Center for American Music, Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington.

Fall 2017

Check the Musicology & Ethnomusicology Events feed on this page for the most up to date information and details on currently scheduled lectures.  Lectures in the current year that have passed are also listed below.
Archive of Past Events

Graduate Colloquium: Student Paper Reading
September 8, 2017. Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library
Isaac Maupin, Immortalizing Otto Hess: Restoring Provenance to Long-Lost Jazz Photographs.

Guest Lecture: Dr. Jennifer Goodlander, Indiana University
September 15, 2017. Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library
Balinese Wayang Shadow Puppetry

Pre-Performance Lecture/Roundtable on Verdi’s La Traviata
September 22, 2017. Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library
Participants will include: Dr. Diana Hallman

Colloquium: Faculty Book Presentation
October 6, 2017. Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library
Jonathan Glixon, Mirrors of Heaven or Worldly Theaters? Venetian Nunneries and Their Music (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017)

Graduate Colloquium: Student Paper Reading
October 13, 2017. Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library
Megan Murph, Schafer and the Book of Noise
(To be presented at "Sounding Out the Space: An International Conference on the Spatiality of Sound" this November in collaboration at the DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama, Dublin School of Creative Arts, and GradCAM).

Graduate Colloquium: Roundtable and Workshops
October 20, 2017. Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library
Sounding Protest and Reflecting on Social Justice in Music
Participants include: Sparky and Rhonda Rucker, Dr. Sonja Downing (Lawrence University), Dr. Nicole Martin (UK, CELT, and African American Studies), Dr. Revell Carr and Prof. Ansel Elkins (UK), Dr. Donna Kwon (UK, moderator)

Rey M. Longyear Lecture: Anne Walters Robertson (University of Chicago)
November 3, 2017. Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library
Fortune in the Margins: Fortuna Desperata and the Late Medieval Mass in the Age of Printing

Graduate Colloquium: Student Paper Reading
November 17, 2017. Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library
Elizabeth Varnado, Sonic Totems: The sampling aesthetics of Bon Iver's ‘33 God’
(To be presented at the Conference of the Association for the Study of the Art of Record Production, Stockholm, Sweden, December 1-3, 2017)

Graduate Colloquium: End-of-Semester Showcase
December 1, 2017. Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library

Books Published By Faculty, Students, & Alumni

Current Faculty


Image of a book coverJonathan Glixon, Mirrors of Heaven or Worldly Theaters? Venetian Nunneries and Their Music (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017)  


Image of a book cover.J. Revell Carr, Hawaiian Music in Motion: Mariners, Missionaries, and Minstrels (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2014)


Word, Image, and Song Volume 1Word, Image, and Song Volume 2Beth Glixon, Rebecca Cypess, and Nathan Link, eds., Word Image and Song: Essays on Early Modern Italy and Essays on Musical Voices (2 vols.) (Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2013)

 

 


Music in Korea: Experiencing Music, Expressing CultureDonna Kwon, Music in Korea: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011)

 

 

 


Studies in Seventeenth-Century Opera Beth Glixon, ed., Studies in Seventeenth-Century Opera (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2010)

 

 

 

 


Opera, Liberalism, and Antisemitism in Nineteenth-Century France: The Politics of Halévy's La JuiveDiana Hallman, Opera, Liberalism, and Antisemitism in Nineteenth-Century France: The Politics of Halévy's La Juive (Cambridge University Press, 2002, 2007)

 

 

 


Inventing the Business of Opera: The Impresario and His World in Mid-Seventeenth-Century VeniceJonathan Glixon and Beth Glixon, Inventing the Business of Opera: The Impresario and His World in Mid-Seventeenth-Century Venice. American Musicological Society Studies in Music (New York: Oxford University Press, 2005)

 

 

 


Honoring God and the City: Music at the Venetian Confraternities Jonathan Glixon, Honoring God and the City: Music at the Venetian Confraternities, 1260-1807 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003)

 

 

 


The Liszt CompanionBen Arnold, ed., The Liszt Companion (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2002)

 

 

 

 


Early Medieval Chants from Nonantola: Sequences, Recent Researches in the Music of the Middle Ages and Early Renaissance, Volume 33Lance Brunner, ed., Early Medieval Chants from Nonantola: Sequences, Recent Researches in the Music of the Middle Ages and Early Renaissance, Volume 33 (Madison: A-R Editions, 1999)

 

 


Music and War: A Research and Information GuideBen Arnold, Music and War: A Research and Information Guide (New York: Garland, 1993)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emeritus Faculty


I Wonder As I Wander: The Life of John Jacob NilesRon Pen, I Wonder As I Wander: The Life of John Jacob Niles (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2010)

 

 

 


Stefano Pavesi, Dies irae concertatoRey Longyear, ed., Stefano Pavesi, Dies irae concertato (Madison: A-R Editions, 1998)

 

 

 


Introduction to MusicRon Pen, Introduction to Music (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1992)

 

 

 

 


Nineteenth-century Romanticism in MusicRey Longyear, Nineteenth-century Romanticism in Music (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 3rd ed. 1988)

 

 

 


Sound Pleasure: a Prelude to Active ListeningDonald Ivey, Sound Pleasure: a Prelude to Active Listening (New York: Schirmer Books, 2nd ed., 1985)

 

 

 


The Symphony in Naples, 1800-1840Rey Longyear, ed., The Symphony in Naples, 1800-1840 (New York: Garland, 1983)

 

 

 

 


The Northern Italian Symphony, 1800-1840

Rey Longyear, ed., The Northern Italian Symphony, 1800-1840 (New York: Garland,1982)

 

 

 


Stanislao Mattei, 5 Symphonies; Niccolò Zingarelli, 7 SymphoniesRey Longyear, ed. Stanislao Mattei, 5 Symphonies; Niccolò Zingarelli, 7 Symphonies (New York: Garland, 1980)

 

 

 

 

Current Students


eresa Carreño, Obras para pianoLaura Pita, ed. (with Juan Francisco Sans), Teresa Carreño, Obras para piano (Caracas: Fondo Editorial de Humanidades y Educación, et al., 2008)

 

 

 

 

Alumni


Music in the Chautauqua Movement From 1874 to the 1930sPaige Lush, Music in the Chautauqua Movement From 1874 to the 1930s (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2013)

 

 

 

 


The Enjoyment of Music: an Introduction to Perceptive ListeningKristine Forney (Ph.D. 1978; with Joseph Machlis), The Enjoyment of Music: an Introduction to Perceptive Listening (New York: W. W. Norton, 11th ed. 2011)

 

 

 


An Anthology of Fifteenth-century Italian PsalmsJohn Karr (Ph.D. 1997), ed., An Anthology of Fifteenth-century Italian Psalms (Ottawa: The Institute of Mediæval Music, 2010)

 

 

 


Danças para banda: coleção música instrumental: acervo do maestro Balthasar de FreitasMarshal Pinto (Ph.D. 2010), ed., Danças para banda: coleção música instrumental: acervo do maestro Balthasar de Freitas (Goiânia: Instituto Centro-Brasileiro de Cultura, 2006)

 

 


Selected Sacred Works by Eighteenth-Century Florentine ComposersJohn Karr (Ph.D. 1997), ed., Selected Sacred Works by Eighteenth-Century Florentine Composers (Louisville: Musica Toscana, 2004)

 

 

 


Da Missa ao Divino Espíírito Santo ao Credo de São José do Tocantins: um episódio da música colonial em GoiásMarshal Pinto (Ph.D. 2010), ed., Da Missa ao Divino Espíírito Santo ao Credo de São José do Tocantins: um episódio da música colonial em Goiás (Goiânia: AGEPEL, 2004)

 

 


The Norton Scores: a Study AnthologyKristine Forney (Ph.D. 1978; with Roger Hickman) The Norton Scores: a Study Anthology (New York: Norton, 9th ed., 2003)

 

 

 


Shostakovich ReconsideredAllan Ho (Ph.D. 1985; with Dmitry Feofanov), Shostakovich Reconsidered (London: Toccata Press, 1998)

 

 

 

 


Chansons Published by Tielman SusatoKristine Forney (Ph.D. 1978),ed., Chansons Published by Tielman Susato. The Sixteenth-century Chanson, 29 (New York: Garland, 1994)

 

 

 


Biographical Dictionary of Russian/Soviet ComposersAllan Ho (Ph.D. 1985; with Dmitry Feofanov), ed. Biographical Dictionary of Russian/Soviet Composers (New York: Greenwood Press, 1989)

 

 

 

Courses Offered

The Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology offers courses in musicology, music history, and music literature for graduate and undergraduate music students and for undergraduate non-majors.

For full details of prerequisites and other requirements, consult the latest Graduate School Bulletin.

For a listing of which courses will be taught in the next semester, consult the public Class Schedule.

Graduate Courses in Musicology and Ethnomusicology

The following courses are designed primarily for graduate students in musicology. Students in the other doctoral programs in music are also welcome. Masters students outside of musicology may enroll with permission of the instructor.

MUS 700 - MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE NOTATION
The study and transcription of the notation of polyphonic music from the medieval and renaissance periods, and of the various keyboard and lute tablatures of the 16th and 17th centuries. Other topics include issues in the study of manuscripts and early printed books, and elements essential to the editing of early music, including editorial accidentals, text underlay, and source comparisons. (Brunner, J. Glixon)

MUS 702 - SEMINAR IN MUSICOLOGY
Study and research in specific musicological problems. See a list of recent seminars.

MUS 703 - PROSEMINAR IN MUSICOLOGICAL METHODS
An introduction to a variety of philosophies and methodologies employed in musicology of the past and present, as well as to influential approaches absorbed from or shared with related disciplines. (Brunner, Hallman)

MUS 710 - INTRODUCTION TO ETHNOMUSICOLOGY
An introduction to the materials and methodologies of the field of enthnomusicology. (Kwon)

MUS 711 -  SEMINAR IN ETHNOMUSICOLOGY
Intensive research-based study of specific problems and topics in ethnomusicology. See a list of recent seminars.

Other Graduate Courses in Music History and Literature

The courses in this category are designed for students in all masters and doctoral programs in music.

Courses for Masters Students Only:

MUS 500 - MUSIC OF THE MIDDLE AGES
The development of Western Music through the 14th century. (Brunner)

MUS 501 - MUSIC OF THE RENAISSANCE
A survey of vocal and instrumental music of the 15th and 16th centuries. (J. Glixon)

MUS 502 - MUSIC OF THE BAROQUE ERA
A history of vocal and instrumental music in the Baroque style from 1600 to 1750. (J. Glixon, B. Glixon)

MUS 503 - MUSIC OF THE CLASSIC PERIOD
The development of music in the Classic style from the early 18th century to 1800. (Hallman)

MUS 504 - MUSIC OF THE 19TH CENTURY
A study of master works of music composed in the 19th century. (Arnold, Hallman)

MUS 505 - MUSIC OF THE 20TH CENTURY
A stylistic study of representative compositions of the 20th century. (Brunner)

MUS 506 - HISTORY OF AMERICAN MUSIC
A survey of cultivated and vernacular musical styles in America from Colonial times to the present. (Pen)

MUS 507 - TOPICS IN MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE
A focused study of a single composer, genre, or musical topic. May be repeated, with different subtitles, for up to 9 credits.

Courses for Masters and Doctoral Students:

MUS 618 - RESEARCH METHODS
A survey of basic research techniques and materials in musicology and theory. (Hallman, B. Glixon)

MUS 622 - SYMPHONIC LITERATURE
An intensive study of orchestral literature from the classical period to the present. (Arnold, Hallman)

MUS 623 - OPERA LITERATURE I
The development of opera as an art form, and analysis of representative operas from various eras. (B. Glixon)

MUS 624 - CHAMBER MUSIC LITERATURE
An intensive study of the development of instrumental chamber music. (Hallman)

MUS 627 - OPERA LITERATURE II
The development of opera as an art form, and analysis of representative operas from various eras. (Hallman)

MUS 690 - TOPICS IN MUSIC HISTORY
Investigation of critical and historical problems in musicology; intensive study of a specific composer, genre, or school of composers.

Recent topics:

  • Bach and Handel and their Milieu (Fall 2017, Brunner)
  • American Innovators (Spring 2017, Brunner)
  • Composers’ Voices (Spring 2016, Brunner)
  • The Sacred in Music (Spring 2015, Brunner)
  • Elizabethan Music (Fall 2014, J. Glixon)
  • Shape-Note Hymnody (Spring 2014, Pen)
  • Jewish Music (Fall 2013, J. Glixon)
  • English Music from the Middle Ages to Handel (Fall 2012, J. Glixon)
  • World Music for Teachers (Spring 2012, Kwon)
  • American Musical Expression (Fall 2011, Pen)
  • Issues in Ethnomusicology: Vocal Music Practices from a Global Perspective (Spring 2011, Kwon)
  • Handel (Spring 2011, B. Glixon)
  • Globalization Issues (Spring 2010, Kwon)
  • Medieval and Renaissance Instrumental Music (Fall 2010, J. Glixon)
  • Chant and Polyphony 900-1300 (Fall, 2009, Brunner)
  • American Innovators (Spring 2009, Brunner)
  • Introduction to Ethnomusicology (Spring 2009, Kwon)
  • Mozart Piano Concertos (Fall 2008, Brunner)
  • Fin de siecle Paris and Vienna (Spring 2008, Hallman)
  • Introduction to Ethnomusicology (Spring 2008, Han)
  • Music in Venice (Fall 2007, B. Glixon)
  • The Music of Handel (Fall 2005, B. Glixon)

Music History Courses for Undergraduate Music Majors

MUS 203 - HISTORY OF MUSIC I
Survey of the history of music from the Medieval through the Baroque period (approximately 800 - 1750). (Brunner, J. Glixon)

MUS 302 - HISTORY OF MUSIC II
A survey of the history of European music during the Classic and Romantic periods of the 18th and 19th centuries. (Hallman)

MUS 303 - HISTORY OF MUSIC III
A survey of the history of music from the Twentieth century including vernacular and cultivated musical expression of the United States. (Pen, Brunner)

MUS 300 - HISTORY OF JAZZ
A listening survey course covering the chronological evolution of jazz from its West African and European roots, through its germination in America, to the present. Emphasis will be on the various styles and functions of jazz, particularly as they have been affected by changing social-cultural patterns during the twentieth century. (Pen, staff)

MUS 301 - APPALACHIAN MUSIC
A survey of musical genre and styles in the Southern Appalachian region. Vocal and instrumental, sacred and secular materials will be covered, together with the interchanges between black and white contributions. (Pen, staff)

MUS 330 - MUSIC IN THE WORLD (Subtitle required)
This course examines the music of a chosen country or region of the world. The study of the historical, stylistic, theoretical, and functional aspects of the music will be related to the socio-historical, philosophical and other cultural aspects of the people in that country or region.

  • Asian Music (Kwon)
  • African Music (Hallman)

MUS 500 - MUSIC OF THE MIDDLE AGES
The development of Western Music through the 14th century. (Brunner)

MUS 501 - MUSIC OF THE RENAISSANCE
A survey of vocal and instrumental music of the 15th and 16th centuries. (J. Glixon)

MUS 502 - MUSIC OF THE BAROQUE ERA
A history of vocal and instrumental music in the Baroque style from 1600 to 1750. (J. Glixon, B. Glixon)

MUS 503 - MUSIC OF THE CLASSIC PERIOD
The development of music in the Classic style from the early 18th century to 1800. (Hallman)

MUS 504 - MUSIC OF THE 19TH CENTURY
A study of master works of music composed in the 19th century. (Hallman)

MUS 505 - MUSIC OF THE 20TH CENTURY
A stylistic study of representative compositions of the 20th century. (Brunner)

MUS 506 - HISTORY OF AMERICAN MUSIC
A survey of cultivated and vernacular musical styles in America from Colonial times to the present. (Pen)

Music History and Literature Courses for Non-Majors

MUS 100 - INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC
A study of the elements of music as they apply to the listening experience; designed for the nonmusic major with no prior knowledge of music. Emphasis will be placed upon developing an awareness and understanding of musical styles from the Renaissance to the present. (Staff)

MUS 206 - AMERICAN MUSIC
A history of music in America from c. 1620 to the present. Will require listening to recordings, reading the primary text and suggested readings in books, periodicals and documents. Students should become aware of important names, places, events and styles in music as well as important historical trends and movements. (Staff)

MUS 220 - SYMPHONIC MUSIC
A survey of the symphonic repertoire from the Classical through the Contemporary Periods. Emphasis will include the development of listening skills and an awareness of musical styles. (Staff)

MUS 221 - SURVEY OF VOCAL MUSIC: OPERA, ART SONG, CHORAL MUSIC
A survey of vocal genres: opera from the Baroque; the Art Song from the Renaissance; and choral music from the Baroque to the present. Significant attention will be given to texts set and to poets and playwrights. (Staff)

MUS 222 - HISTORY AND SOCIOLOGY OF ROCK MUSIC
A listening survey course, with a chronological approach, covering the years 1950- present. Emphasis will be on both the music and the sociological climate reflected and advocated by the music. (Staff)

MUS 300 - HISTORY OF JAZZ
A listening survey course covering the chronological evolution of jazz from its West African and European roots, through its germination in America, to the present. Emphasis will be on the various styles and functions of jazz, particularly as they have been affected by changing social-cultural patterns during the twentieth century. (Pen, staff)

MUS 301 - APPALACHIAN MUSIC
A survey of musical genre and styles in the Southern Appalachian region. Vocal and instrumental, sacred and secular materials will be covered, together with the interchanges between black and white contributions. (Pen, staff)

MUS 330 - MUSIC IN THE WORLD (Subtitle required)
This course examines the music of a chosen country or region of the world. The study of the historical, stylistic, theoretical, and functional aspects of the music will be related to the socio-historical, philosophical and other cultural aspects of the people in that country or region.

  • Asian Music (Kwon)
  • African Music (Hallman)

Through the generosity of Rey and Katherine Longyear, the Division sponsors an annual series of distinguished guest lectures. UK supports a comprehensive music collection through the Lucille Little Fine Arts Library, and provides numerous opportunities for original research in its special collections, most notably those of the John Jacob Niles Center for American Music.

For further information on our programs, please contact Donna Kwon, Coordinator of the Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology.

Learn More About Our Current Students

Musicology & Ethnomusicology Faculty

Professor
Musicology
309 Fine Arts Building
859-257-8169
Associate Professor
Musicology
319 Rose Lane #101
859-257-9541
Assistant Professor; Director of the John Jacob Niles Center for American Music
Musicology
Office N/A
Professor
Musicology, Provost's Distinguished Service Professor
204 Wessel House
859-257-1694
Instructor
Musicology
Office Location N/A
859-257-1694
Associate Professor
Musicology
133 FA
859-257-8184
Associate Professor
Ethnomusicology; Coordinator for Musicology and Ethnomusicology
5A FA
859-257-4912
Professor Emeritus
Musicology
Office N/A
Lecturer
World Music
107A FA
859-257-4900