Jefferson Johnson

Professor
Director of Choral Activities

Degrees:
DMA University of Colorado 1992
MM University of Tennessee 1981
BME University of Georgia 1978

At UK since: 1993

Jefferson Johnson is Director of Choral Activities at the University of Kentucky where he conducts the University Chorale and Men's Chorus. He also teaches advanced choral conducting, choral methods and literature, and directs the graduate program (MM and DMA degrees) in choral music. A native of Atlanta, Johnson received the Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Georgia (magna cum laude, 1978), the Master of Music from the University of Tennessee (1981), and the Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of Colorado (1992). While living in Atlanta, Johnson was also a member of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus and Chamber Chorus conducted by Robert Shaw.

Johnson is presently Music Director of the Lexington Singers. The 180-voice community chorus annually performs major works with the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra. The Singers have toured internationally, most recently to Brazil, France, Italy, and Austria.  In 2000 the chorus performed Mozart’sRequiem with the Vienna Mozart Orchestra in the famous Hofburg Palace and sang the evening mass at the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris. In 2003 the chorus performed in St. Marks Cathedral in Venice and sang mass at St. Peters Basilica in Vatican City. In 1999 the Lexington Singers celebrated its 40th anniversary with a performance in New York City as Johnson made his Carnegie Hall debut conducting the Singers and orchestra in Faure’s Requiem.

Johnson maintains an active schedule as an adjudicator and guest conductor for high-school and collegiate choirs throughout the United States. He has conducted honor choruses in 30 states and has appeared as a featured clinician at ACDA or MENC conventions in Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia.