Music, Dance, and Diplomacy Symposium

EMILY ABRAMS ANSARI ,UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO
“Bernstein in Moscow: Challenging Cold War Narratives as a Government-Funded TV Diplomat”

Emily Abrams Ansari is an associate professor in music history and Assistant Dean of Research at the University of Western Ontario in Canada. Ansari’s research lies in the area of music and politics, particularly focused on national identity and music. She has won a number of major prizes for her work, including the ASCAP Deems Taylor/Virgil Thomson Award, the Kurt Weill Prize, and the Society for American Music’s Cambridge University Press Award. Recent journal publications and her book, The Sound of a Superpower: Musical Americanism and the Cold War (OUP, 2018), consider the effect of the Cold War on American classical composers. Ansari has recently launched two new projects. The first is a double biography of African American composer Ulysses Kay and civil rights activist Barbara Kay, his wife. The second is a collaborative, interdisciplinary, decolonial project in El Salvador, examining the folk music of refugees from El Salvador’s civil war during the 1980s.

JENNIFER L. CAMPBELL, UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
“Finding Consonance between the North/South American Continents: Dance Impresario Lincoln Kirstein and Brazilian composer Francisco Mignone”

Jennifer L. Campbell is Assistant Professor of Music Theory at the University of Kentucky. She specializes twentieth and twenty-first century American music, focusing on composers Aaron Copland, Virgil Thomson, and Paul Bowles, and she also undertakes interdisciplinary projects, exploring connections between music, dance, art, politics, and cultural identity. She has published on such topics in the journal Diplomatic History (2012), in the volume Paul Bowles—The New Generation: Do You Bowles? (2014), and in the book Meanings and Makings of Queer Dance (Oxford University Press, 2017). Her current endeavors include a book project, tentatively titled American Musical Diplomacy in the 1940s: The Power of Tonality; a monograph on Thomson’s ballet Filling Station; and conference papers and articles on music by composers Missy Mazzoli, Mily Balakirev and Franz Schubert. 

CLARE CROFT, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
“Walking the Straight and Narrow Path: Alvin Ailey’s Dance with the U.S. State Department”

Clare Croft is a dance historian and theorist, as well as a dramaturg and curator. She is the author of Dancers as Diplomats: ​​​​​​​American Choreography in Cultural Exchange (Oxford, 2015), a study of the U.S. State Department’s sponsorship of international dance tours as a form of cultural diplomacy. She is also the editor of the book and website Queer Dance: Meanings and Makings (Oxford, 2017), a collection of essays by scholars and artists. In connection to this volume, Croft also curates the EXPLODE: queer dance project, which began in Ann Arbor (2012-15), toured to New York (2015), and toured nationally in 2019. Clare is also the founder and curator of Daring Dances, a program created to imagine how dancemaking and dance-viewing can lead us into difficult conversations. She is Associate Professor of Dance and American Culture at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor.​​​​​​​

MARK KATZ, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
“The B-Boys and Voguers of Bandung: Hip hop, Conflict, Queerness, and International Diplomacy”

Mark Katz is Professor of Music at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Founding Director of the hip hop cultural diplomacy program, Next Level. His books include Capturing Sound: How Technology has Changed Music (2004, rev. 2010), Groove Music: The Art and Culture of the Hip-Hop DJ (2012), and Build: The Power of Hip Hop Diplomacy in a Divided World (2019). He is co-editor of Music, Sound, and Technology in America: A Documentary History (2012) and former editor of the Journal of the Society for American Music. In 2015 Katz was recognized by the Hip-Hop Education Center in its inaugural awards ceremony, and in 2016 he was awarded the Dent Medal by the Royal Musical Association for his contributions to musicology.

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This Symposium was made possible by a grant from the University of Kentucky School of Music.

Dec 13 2019, 2:30pm
Niles Gallery
FREE
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