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'No Worries' — ACE Staging Two More Performances of 'Lion King Jr.'

Wed, 07/22/2015 - 5:26pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 23, 2015) — As Timon and Pumbaa would say, "Hakuna Matata." You still have two more opportunities to catch "The Lion King Jr." presented by the University of Kentucky Academy for Creative Excellence (ACE). The musical, based on the Disney film, will take the stage 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, July 25, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.

 

"The Lion King" has captivated the imagination of audiences around the world for more than 20 years. This regional premiere of "The Lion King Jr." brings to life Simba, Rafiki, Nala, the Lioness Pride, Scar and the animals of the African savanna on their unforgettable journey. The coming-of-age tale, featuring ACE's Broadway Bound middle school/high school cast, is appropriate for audiences of all ages.

 

ACE was created in 2009 as a preparatory performing arts program for young students in Lexington and the surrounding communities. The academy provides training and instruction in performing arts and encourages excellence, enthusiasm, professionalism and passion among its students. ACE is a department of UK Opera Theatre.

 

Tickets for "The Lion King" are $10 for children (12 and under) and $12 for general admission. To purchase, contact the Singletary Center ticket office by phone at 859-257-4929, visit online at www.scfatickets.com, or in person at the venue. Processing fees will be added to purchase upon transaction.

 

UK Opera Theatre is part of the UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts. The School of Music has garnered national recognition for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Sounds of UK Talents Fill the Summer Air in Spain, Prague

Mon, 07/20/2015 - 4:10pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 21, 2015) — From a chorus of more than 50 voices to the baton movement on a conductor's rostrum, the talents of the students and faculty of University of Kentucky School of Music were in the spotlight this summer in cathedrals, concert halls and theatres across Spain and in Prague, even in one site that premiered a popular opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

 

In Spain, a little less than half of the members of UK Women's Choir had the opportunity to further their own education while enriching the lives of others through the beauty of music and cultural exchange in a tour running June 9-19. Student vocalists on the trip not only had a chance to learn about the rich, musical heritage of Spain but also were able to perform in some of the country's most historic cathedrals.

 

During the tour, the choir visited Madrid, Seville, Córdoba, Granada, Torremolinos and Toledo and took in such famous sites as the Cathedral of Toledo, Church of Santo Tome, Alhambra, Generalife and the Mezquita Catedral de Córdoba. Under the direction of Associate Director of the UK School of Music Lori Hetzel, the UK Women's Choir performed five concerts across the country, including an exchange concert with the University of Córdoba, a concert with the Seville Youth Orchestra, a Mass at Basilica Nuestra Señora de Las Angustias, and a concert with the children's choir of Granada.

 

"Paying for this trip was especially hard for me but singing with the UK Women's Choir was an experience that made my soul richer than I could've ever imagined," said music education sophomore Savannah Fallis, of Oneida, Kentucky. "I was able to explore places that many people only dream about, make music with my talented friends, and form memories that will last a lifetime."

 

Fellow choir member Malinda Massey, a secondary English education and English senior from Albany, Georgia, agrees the trip was a major blessing. "Being a part of the Women's Choir has always been an adventure, and going overseas with the group made me better understand the musicianship and sisterhood that we all share between one another. To hear our voices echoing in the sanctuaries of cathedrals in Madrid and Grenada was both humbling and moving...We were reaching out to people from another country in a universal language we all spoke, and the connection I felt between myself and the audiences, our choir, and our music was something truly irreplaceable. Joining the UK Women's Choir has proved to be one of the best decisions I've made since coming to college, and going on tour with them proved just that."

 

The UK Women’s Choir is a select ensemble composed of more than 100 of the school’s most talented female voices. The singers, ranging from freshmen to graduate students, represent a variety of musical backgrounds and academic disciplines. The choir’s challenging and diverse repertoire includes literature spanning from Gregorian chant to eight-part music of the 21st Century. With an emphasis on music by female composers, the ensemble performs works of many different languages and compositional forms.

 

More than 2,000 kilometers away Director of UK Orchestras John Nardolillo raised his baton on performances of Mozart's "Don Giovanni" at the Prague Estates Theatre, home to the very stage the legendary composer premiered the opera in 1787. The production was staged as part of the inaugural "Prague Summer Nights Young Artists Music Festival," presented by Classical Movements.

 

As part of the festival, Maestro Nardolillo conducted four performances of "Don Giovanni" under the direction of famed baritone Sherrill Milnes. The 30-day Young Artist Festival, running June 7 to July 6, with 100 students featured multiple concerts and productions. Nearly 500 singers and instrumentalists auditioned to be considered for the Prague Summer Nights Festival from all over the world and finally 45 singers, including three UK Opera Theatre vocalists, and 55 musicians, including 24 members from UK Symphony Orchestra, were selected along with leading faculty from all over the world. In addition to conducting, Nardolillo served as artistic director of the music festival. 

 

"Classical Movements has created an extraordinary program and we believe that no other summer musical training offers young artists so many different opportunities to perform in such magnificent venues — both for opera singers and instrumentalists. We were fortunate to get such high caliber applications and to attract such superior faculty," said Neeta Helms, president of Classical Movements Inc.

 

Festival highlights included the Opera Gala in the Estates Theatre; a performance of work by Mozart and Maurice Duruflé with the Anchorage Concert Chorus in Smetana Hall; a production of "Suor Angelica" in the Church of St. Simon and Jude, where Joseph Haydn and Mozart performed; a performance by the orchestra at Smetana Hall; chamber music and song recitals in the salon of the Antonin Dvořák Museum in Prague; and a cabaret in one of Prague’s famous jazz clubs. 

 

Performers in the "Prague Summer Nights Young Artists Music Festival" hailed from the United States, England, Germany, Korea, Canada, China, Mexico, Argentina, Russia, Croatia and the Czech Republic, and are from top music conservatories and universities such as the Juilliard School, the Manhattan School of Music, Indiana University, the University of Southern California, the Peabody Conservatory, the Eastman School of Music, the University of Kentucky, the University of Michigan, the New England Conservatory, Northwestern University, the Royal College of Music and the Royal Academy of Music in London, as well as schools in Germany and Austria.

 

Joining Nardolillo from UK were three opera students and 24 musicians. The opera students performing in Prague were: vocal performance senior Mary Catherine Wright, of Lexington; 2015 graduate Taeeun Moon, of Busan, South Korea; and graduate student Christopher Kenney, of Fargo, North Dakota. The 24 UK instrumentalists playing in the orchestra included: Makaila Babiarz, Alexis Corsaut, Heather Gosnell, Sarah Grindle, Chandler Martin, Isabelle Martin, Miranda Martin, Maya McCutchen, Matthew McMahon, Jessica Miskelly, Kristen Morrill, Maria Navarra, Diana Pecaro, Emily Rush, Daniel Taylor, Nathan Williams, and Jessie Zhu. In addition to performing, Miskelly, UK Symphony Orchestra's concertmaster, served as concertmaster of the orchestra for the "Prague Summer Nights Young Artists Music Festival."

 

Classical Movements is one of the world’s leading concert planning and music management companies. Clients include some of the world’s finest orchestras and choruses around the world. In its 22 years, Classical Movements has worked in over 140 countries on six continents. The company also commissions new music through its Eric Daniel Helms New Music Program, supporting orchestra and choral clients as well as composers, and it owns an international choral series and four annual international music festivals in Europe, South America, Africa and North America. 

 

The UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Get More Social Media Savvy with UK Arts Administration Workshop

Fri, 07/17/2015 - 3:47pm

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 20, 2015) — The University of Kentucky Arts Administration Program will present the "Executive Workshop Series: Best Practices in Social Media" later this week. The professional development workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, July 24, in room five of UK's Main Building.  

 

This social media workshop is part of a series of programs for arts administrators of all levels. The workshop will offer social media strategies to further the missions of arts-based and other nonprofit organizations.

 

The seminar is only $55 and includes lunch. A 20 percent discount will be given to multiple participants from the same organization. Participants should register in advance at the Executive Workshop Series page at http://finearts.uky.edu/arts-administration/executive-workshop-series-registration.

 

The workshop will focus on the following topics presented by Arts Administration program faculty and alumni:

· "Trending: Meeting the Mission through Social Media";

· "Effective Communication to Recruit and Retain the Millennial Arts Audience";

· "#engage";

· "Making Social Media Work for You: Maximizing Engagement in Existing Audiences through Formatting, Promotion, and Scheduling";

· "Tumblr Blogging for Arts Organizations";

· "Pacing Those Posts"; and

· "Pin it to Win It: Photography-based Marketing on Social Media."

 

UK's Arts Administration Program, in the UK College of Fine Arts, is designed to prepare students for a future in the management of arts organizations. Students are provided with a strong liberal arts education, an understanding of the business world, and a comprehensive education in one of the four arts disciplines of art, music, dance and theatre.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

 

 

UK Professor Honored with Alabama's Distinguished Artist Award

Thu, 07/02/2015 - 2:39pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 6, 2015) — University of Kentucky's Everett McCorvey received the 2015 Alabama Distinguished Artist Award at the Celebration of the Arts awards ceremony, which took place May 20 at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival in Montgomery.

 

The Alabama State Council on the Arts annually recognizes individuals who made significant contributions to the arts at the Celebration of the Arts event. The ceremony brings art enthusiasts together to recognize and appreciate a group of exceptionally talented Alabamians and their work in support of the arts in Alabama and beyond. McCorvey was one of seven individuals recognized at this year's event, receiving the 2015 Alabama Distinguished Artist Award. Tenor Roderick George performed at the event in honor of McCorvey with a Metropolitan Opera favorite from "Rigoletto." George is an acclaimed member of the American Spiritual Ensemble.

 

In 1995, the council added the Distinguished Artist Award to recognize artists who made especially significant contributions to the Alabama arts and their art forms. The award is presented to a professional artist considered a native Alabamian or an adopted son/daughter of the state, who earned national recognition and acclaim for their artwork over a period of time.

 

A professor of voice and the director and executive producer of UK Opera Theatre at UK School of Music, McCorvey received his bachelor's and doctoral degrees from the University of Alabama. He is the artistic director of the National Chorale, as well as the founder and music director of the American Spiritual Ensemble, and president of a production and management company for musical/theatrical events named Global Creative Connections. Additionally. McCorvey, a tenor, has traveled the world with performances in a number of festivals and theaters.

 

A former member of the board of directors for the National Assembly of State Art Agencies, McCorvey was appointed by Kentucky's governor to two terms on the board of directors of the Kentucky Arts Council and currently serves as a vice-chair. He also previously served as the executive producer of the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.

 

UK Opera Theatre is one of a select groups of U.S. opera training programs recommended by the Richard Tucker Music Foundation. The Tucker Foundation is a nonprofit cultural organization dedicated to the support and advancement of the careers of talented American opera singers by bringing opera into the community and heightening appreciation for opera by supporting music education enrichment programs.

 

UK Opera Theatre is part of the UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history. 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Only Three More 'Grand Nights' Ahead

Fri, 06/12/2015 - 1:05pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 15, 2015) — University of Kentucky Opera Theatre will wrap up its 23rd production of It's a Grand Night for Singing! with its last three performances June 19-21, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.

 

Since 1993, this popular event has kicked off the start of Central Kentucky's summer arts season, with an incredible turnout and multiple sold-out shows. It's a Grand Night for Singing! is a highly anticipated production in Lexington, with university and regional performers showing off their talent. The event features Broadway-inspired music as well as Top 40 hits to entertain guests of all ages.

 

Grand Night tickets are $45 for general admission, $40 for seniors and $15 for students with valid student IDs. A special 40 percent discount has been added this year for members of the military and their families with a valid military ID. In addition, each performance has a limited number of select seats available to UK staff for only $25. Military and staff tickets must be purchased by phone or in person. Tickets for "Grand Night" are available through the Singletary Center ticket office, by phone at 859-257-4929, online at www.scfatickets.com or in person at the venue. All applicable fees will be added to tickets upon purchase transaction.

 

UK Opera Theatre is one of a select group of U.S. opera training programs recommended by the Richard Tucker Music Foundation. The Tucker Foundation is a nonprofit cultural organization dedicated to the support and advancement of the careers of talented American opera singers by bringing opera into the community and heightening appreciation for opera by supporting music education enrichment programs.

 

UK Opera Theatre is part of the UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history. 

UK Jazz Saxophonist Upbeat About DownBeat Award

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 2:45pm

Video by UK Public Relations and Marketing. View transcript here. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 12, 2015) — University of Kentucky School of Music doctoral student and tenor saxophonist Carlos Espinosa Jr. is the recipient of the Outstanding Performer Award in the Blues/Pop/Rock Soloist category in DownBeat’s 38th annual student music awards featured in the magazine's June issue.

 

DownBeat is one of the world’s leading jazz and contemporary music publications. Students and educators can nominate themselves for the magazine's annual awards, and applicants range from junior high to graduate level individuals and ensembles. There are a variety of categories that include large jazz ensembles, jazz chamber groups, vocal ensembles and individual awards for composition, improvisation and producing.

 

The DownBeat award nomination process involves an online application and submission of audio recordings to be judged by professional musicians and educators from across the country. Judging criteria are based on musicianship, creativity, improvisation, technique, sound quality and balance, excitement and authority. 

 

The DownBeat Music Awards are considered the most prestigious awards in jazz education. More than 1,000 entries were submitted across all categories this year.

 

"This DownBeat award is an achievement of the highest honor," said Miles Osland, director of UK Jazz Studies and professor of saxophone. "The international competition is fierce — especially in the graduate category"

 

Espinosa, a third year Doctor of Musical Arts candidate in saxophone performance from Killeen, Texas, submitted a few recordings from one of his doctoral recitals, all of which were original compositions.

 

"I owe a debt of gratitude to the musicians that performed along with me: pianist Ben Geyer, bassist Rob Barnes, and drummer Paul Deatherage," Espinosa said. "I would not have won this award without them. As musicians, we are constantly inspiring and pushing each other to grow, so even though it is an individual award, they were the reason I was able to bring my compositions to life."

 

This is the third DownBeat award Espinosa has won, but his first in an individual category. The other two were in the Large Jazz Ensemble category as a member of the University of North Texas 2 O’Clock Lab Band.

 

Osland is far from surprised with Espinosa's recognition. "Carlos has been my doctoral teaching assistant for the past three years. In that time, he has proven to me to be the most passionate and talented performer and educator that I have had the privilege of mentoring."

 

There are numerous award winners in the 38-year history of DownBeat awards that have gone on to become successful professional musicians. The individual awards are especially prestigious, as the name recognition is helpful in networking with other professional musicians and educators. The awards also help bring recognition to the university and the professors who work with the up-and-coming artists. Espinosa is thrilled that UK and Professor Osland will receive well-deserved recognition for this award as well. 

 

During the time Osland has led UK Jazz Studies, the university's program has had eight previous award winners in the DownBeat competition. UK Mega-Sax has won three times in the Jazz Combo category, and in 2007 the UK Jazz Ensemble won in two categories (Jazz Combo and Classical Chamber Ensemble), the only time this has happened in the history of the magazine. In addition, alumni David Harper, Angela Ortega and Dieter Rice have previously won in the Classical Soloist, Jazz Vocalist and Blues/Pop/Rock Soloist categories.

 

"It is humbling to be acknowledged by my musical peers and heroes for my improvisation," Espinosa said. "It is a good feeling to have others recognize the hard work and dedication invested in your craft."

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

'Grand Night' Still Going Strong at 23

Mon, 06/08/2015 - 1:39pm

 

"It's a Grand Night for Singing!" promo video courtesy of UK Opera Theatre. 

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 9, 2015) — Guaranteed to have you singing and dancing in your seats, University of Kentucky Opera Theatre presents the 23rd annual production of “It’s a Grand Night for Singing!” Executive Producer Everett McCorvey brings together a company of more than 100 performers to stage the best from Billboard to Broadway June 12-21, at the Singletary Center for the Arts. And in recognition of their service, "Grand Night" will offer a new discount this year to members of the military and their families.

 

Students from UK Opera Theatre join forces again with members of the Lexington community to open the summer arts season with this popular annual town-and-gown revue. Among this year's hits will be music from such icons as Bob Marley, Cyndi Lauper and Carol King, as well as showstoppers from musicals like "A Chorus Line," "Pippin" and "Cabaret."

 

Showtimes for the six performances of "Grand Night" are 7:30 p.m., June 12, 13, 19 and 20, and 2 p.m., June 14 and 21.

 

"Grand Night" tickets are $45 for general admission, $40 for seniors and $15 for students with valid student IDs. A special 40 percent discount has been added this year for members of the military and their families with a valid military ID.

 

In addition, each performance will also have a limited number of select seats available to UK staff for only $25. The special staff price is presented in memory of Russ Williams, the university's first representative of the staff on UK's Board of Trustees who died in 2009. 

 

Tickets for "Grand Night" are available through the Singletary Center ticket office, by phone at 859-257-4929, online at www.scfatickets.com or in person at the venue. Military and staff tickets must be purchased by phone or in person. All applicable fees will be added to tickets upon purchase transaction.

   

UK Opera Theatre is one of a select group of U.S. opera training programs recommended by the Richard Tucker Music Foundation. The Tucker Foundation is a nonprofit cultural organization dedicated to the support and advancement of the careers of talented American opera singers by bringing opera into the community and heightening appreciation for opera by supporting music education enrichment programs.

 

The UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Student's Win at International Competition Places Her on Carnegie Hall Stage

Tue, 05/19/2015 - 3:18pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 20, 2015) — This Memorial Day, the University of Kentucky will be well represented on one of the nation's most prestigious stages as doctoral candidate Hye Jin Yeom performs at Carnegie Hall. Yeom was one of only 12 first place winners in the college students and professionals' pianist category at the American Protégé International Piano and Strings Competition, which qualifies her to perform in a special winners recital held in Carnegie Hall's Weill Recital Hall on May 25.

 

A solo appearance at Carnegie Hall is no small feat. "It is a dream for any serious musician to play solo at Carnegie Hall. A performance there never 'just happens' — one has to earn it with hard work, dedication and never-ending self-improvement," said Yeom's professor, Irina Voro, professor of piano at UK School of Music.

 

Yeom will play Allegro de Concierto, op. 49 by Spanish composer Enrique Granados.

 

American Protégé is dedicated to advancing the careers and promoting the talents of all participants and winners. Judges select several winners from different categories including brass, wind, piano, string and voice. The competition is open to artists from around the world who qualify in any of five categories related to age and experience.

 

The 2015 competition saw submissions from musicians from approximately 30 countries. Previous winners have gone on to perform on TV shows, such as "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" and "The Voice," as well as several prestigious concerts.

 

"Hye Jin Yeom definitely earned her performance at Carnegie Hall. It is an honor for UK School of Music and the entire university that our student won first prize at the international competition," Voro said.

 

Yeom recently completed her second year of doctoral studies under Voro. She earned her master's degree in piano performance from Morehead State University.

 

Music has been an important part of Yeom's life from a very early age when she began playing the piano at the age of 5 in her home in South Korea. "Music is beyond language, I believe. And the music depicts the ‘beyondness’ of the world and human beings."  

 

Locally, the award-winning musician can be heard not only on a UK stage but also at Harrodsburg Christian Church, where she plays the piano and organ.

 

Yeom's passion for music is still strong more than 25 years after the first time sitting down at a piano. "I love Hans Andersen’s expression about music: 'Where words fail, music speaks,'" Yeom said. "Without music, I don’t know how I could awake my soul to see the world the way it is."

 

The UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

UK Musician Named Disneyland All-American

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 11:42am

Video by UK Public Relations and Marketing

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 7, 2015) — Lexington native Colleen Wagoner will be headed to California this month to be a part of the All-American College Band in Disneyland. Wagoner, a graduating music education senior, will be playing baritone saxophone for the prestigious summer program which has been around since 1971.

 

“As a musician, it is rare that we get opportunities like these where we are living and breathing music 24 hours a day and seven days a week,” Wagoner said. “Playing, rehearsing and talking to my band mates on a daily basis will influence and benefit me as a musician more than I can even grasp right now.”

 

Wagoner has been playing the saxophone for roughly eight years after making the switch from flute to saxophone in high school. Since being at UK, she has gained experience in flute, saxophone and clarinet. Wagoner has studied for five years under Director of Jazz Studies and Professor of Saxophone Miles Osland, who she counts as a mentor as well as his wife Lisa Osland, adjunct professor of saxophone. While this will be her first trip to California, Wagoner has played several events across the country as a member of Wildcat Marching BandUK Mega-Sax, the UK Sax Quartets, UK Jazz Combos, UK Wind Symphony and UK Jazz Ensemble, which she toured China with last summer. 

 

The Disneyland All-American College Band is an ensemble of 21 college musicians who provide musical entertainment in the park. Disney chooses students who are musically gifted, have a diverse musical background and an expressive and outgoing personality as part of the All-American Band. Wagoner is only the second UK student to make the band.

 

Along with performing five-days-a-week, band members will also be able to study with professional musicians from the Los Angelese area and complete a musical educational project. Performances include big band, flag retreat and several parade shows throughout the park. In addition to being the only member playing the baritone saxophone, Wagoner will also be asked to play the flute, clarinet and piccolo while with the Disneyland All-American College Band.

 

The audition process consisted of one round of submitted video auditions followed by a second round of live auditions. As part of the band, Wagoner and her bandmates will live in California for three months where they are provided housing and a weekly stipend.

 

“The group is extremely difficult to get into, and I still can hardly believe I made it,” Wagoner said. “I can't wait to see how much better I become as a saxophone player once my time at Disney is up.”

 

UK Jazz Studies is part of the UK School of Music at UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Arts Administration Students Help At-Risk Kids Capture 'A Beautiful Life'

Mon, 05/04/2015 - 3:12pm

 

Video from Studio Walz website, www.studiowalz.com/blog.  

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 5, 2015) — As adults, many of us look back fondly on childhood and the world of wonder that surrounded us. Nothing seemed impossible until the daily routine of life dampened our sense of optimism with age and responsibility.

 

Unfortunately, bleak realities can come all too early for some children, who witness domestic violence or struggle with illness at an early age. In an attempt to help bring light to these sometimes dark times, a class of University of Kentucky arts administration students developed real life arts workshops for children working with two Lexington organizations. The resulting artwork is the focus of a book published by the class that will raise money for the organizations and future community art programs from the class.

 

The enterprising UK arts administration students presenting these art workshops are part of a spring course first presented in 2014 that created an initiative called Art in Unlikely Places. The class is led by Mark Rabideau, adjunct assistant professor and director of undergraduate studies in the Arts Administration Program. The goal of Art in Unlikely Places is driven by a belief that creativity is the seed of hope. The initiative connects inspiring artists to those most in need of the transformative powers of the arts.

 

The students' vision is that this organization will deliver the work of inspiring artists to the ailing, the impoverished and the distraught, sharing beauty with those whose life-circumstances might otherwise prevent them from discovering the hope that is found in the artistic moment. 

 

Students participating in Art in Unlikely Places, now in its second year, developed a project titled "A Beautiful Life: Through the Eyes of a Child." The project introduced children in need to the arts by providing them an opportunity to express themselves in creative ways. At the suggestion of some members of the class, the group partnered with Greenhouse 17, a refuge for children who have been witness to domestic violence, and The Kidz Club, where children with medical needs are provided special attention with academic and social interaction.

 

"As a child, the arts were so strongly encouraged to me at an early age. The same goes with my classmates. We wanted to share our love with these children, so that they could have an opportunity like we did to experience the power the arts have," said art studio senior Janie Kegley, of Louisa, Kentucky, who serves as director of marketing for the arts administration course.

 

Art in Unlikely Places held workshops with 30 local children from the organizations, prompting the kids to create artwork that expressed their inner feelings, hopes and dreams. All were asked to draw what made life beautiful to them.

 

In addition to using visual arts to help the children give voice to their feelings, the class also invited music therapists from Evolve to partner with them and lead the children in songs and games.

 

Lending his talents to "A Beautiful Life” is renowned fiber artist, UK Professor Arturo Alonzo Sandoval. The internationally celebrated artist was pleased to participate when approached by one of his students, noting that service is one of the three elements of being a UK professor.

 

The class was honored Sandoval took them up on their request. "Arturo is an artist who has touched the lives of myself and another student inside our class. When we were discussing artists there really wasn't any competition. His heart is so big and he achieved a product even better than we imagined. He did all of this for free and we are so grateful," Kegley said.

 

Sandoval, with the assistance of photographer Scott Walz, incorporated images of the artworks the children created into four quilts. Two of the art quilts will be donated to the respected organizations and the remaining two have been sold to benefit the program.

 

"The four art quilts are digital compositions of the original drawings the participating children accomplished," Sandoval said. "Scott Walz, my IT designer/expert, used his skills and our collaborative design sense to layer the children’s drawings into four lovely images with lots of energy, color and texture."

 

Sandoval and Walz believe helping bring the artwork from the coloring page to a book and art quilt form was a great fit for their talents. "The goal of art is to communicate beauty," Sandoval said.

 

For only $30, arts patrons can purchase the book of original artworks by children at Greenhouse 17 and The Kidz Club and receive an invitation to Art in Unlikely Places finale this week. All Art in Unlikely places supporters will be invited to the unveiling celebration of the final artworks Thursday, May 7, at Lexington Art League. Light refreshments will be served accompanied by a musical guest appearance from the popular UK a cappella group, the acoUstiKats.

 

Proceeds from the event will allow Art in Unlikely Places to continue to send art workshops back to Greenhouse 17 and The Kidz Club.

 

Additional funds will also insure that the Art in Unlikely Places will continue to thrive and benefit the future students of the program. "This class is groundbreaking in education. We want to make sure the students after us can have the same experience. It has truly been life changing," Kegley said.

 

In addition to the dedicated students in Art in Unlikely Places, who created and executed "A Beautiful Life," the project also was made possible with support of local organizations and businesses like the UK College of Fine Arts, WRFL, Red Mango, T.G.I. Fridays and Bourbon n' Toulouse, who helped the class and UK student organization achieve their fundraising and marketing goals for the semester.

 

For further information on this student project, visit Arts in Unlikely Places at their GoFundMe website: www.gofundme.com/artinunlikelyplace. You can also find them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter at: www.facebook.com/artin.unlikelyplaces; www.twitter.com/ArtinUnlikely; and www.instagram.com/artinunlikelyplaces

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Voices Dominate at NATS Regional

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 1:33pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 1, 2015) — Many University of Kentucky School of Music students took home honors, including wins in 10 categories, at the 2015 Mid-South Region of the National Association of Teachers of Singing Inc. (NATS) competition held April 17-18, at UK. The event featured 261 vocalists from 30 schools, universities and private studios in Kentucky and Tennessee competing.

 

The 10 UK Opera Theatre students who took first place in their divisions at the NATS competition are:

· vocal performance and music education sophomore Willnard Anderson, from Florissant, Missouri, who won the Sophomore Men Division;

· doctoral candidate Shareese Arnold, from Lexington, who won the Post Advanced Division;

· vocal performance senior Gabrielle Baker, from Lexington, who won the Advanced Women Division;

· vocal performance freshman Clark Davis, from Lexington, who won the Freshman Women Division;

· vocal performance and music education freshman Blake Denson, from Paducah, Kentucky, who won the Freshman Men Division;

· graduate student Brittany Jones, from Louisville, Kentucky, who won the Adult Intermediate Division;

· graduate student Christopher Kenney, from Fargo, North Dakota, who won the Advanced Men Division;

· vocal performance senior Laura Salyer, from Lexington, who won the Senior Women Division;

· vocal performance junior Mary Catherine Wright, from Lexington, who won the Junior Women Division; and

· music education sophomore Joseph Wrightson, from Lexington, who won the Music Theater Underclass Division.

 

Anderson, Barker, Davis and Wright study voice under Everett McCorvey, director of UK Opera Theatre and the OperaLex Endowed Chair in Opera Studies. Kenney studies under Endowed Chair, Professor of Voice Cynthia Lawrence. Arnold studies under Angelique Clay, associate professor of voice. Denson and Wrightson study under Dennis Bender, associate professor of voice. Jones studies under Noemi Lugo, professor of voice.

 

In addition to the 10 wins, UK opera students took home 14 second place and third place finishes at the NATS Mid-South Region. Those students and honors are:

· Jonathan Adams, third place in the Junior Men Division;

· Jenna Day, third place in the Music Theater Underclass Division; 

· Alyssa Marie Detterich, third place in the Junior Women Division; 

· Liz Frodge, second place in the Junior Women Division; 

· Wesley Hammond, third place in the Music Theater Upperclass Division;

· Caitlyn Howard, second place in the Advanced Women Division;

· Henry Huhtulag, third place in the Freshman Men Division; 

· Thabang Masango, second place in the Adult Intermediate Division;

· Steven  Olson, third place in the Men Sophomore Division;

· Michael Pandolfo, second place in the Freshman Men Division;

· Maria Daniela Ruiz, third place in the Freshman Women Division; 

· Hunter Shaner, second place in the Men Sophomore Division;

· Maggie Smith, second place in the Senior Women Division; and  

· Mary Catherine Wright, second place in the Music Theater Upperclass Division.

 

Accompanying UK's finalists at the competition were Suna Avci-Gunther, coach at the Academy for Creative Excellence and assistant music director of Schmidt Opera Outreach Program; William Cooper, UK alumna Maris Deddens; Maureen Howell; Cliff Jackson; Tedrin Blair Lindsay, lecturer and vocal coach; doctoral candidate Yuri Kim; doctoral candidate Lucia Marin; Nan McSwain, lecturer and vocal coach; Lynn Vera; and music education sophomore Wurile Wang.

 

NATS encourages the highest standards of the vocal art and of ethical principles in the teaching of singing and promotes vocal education and research at all levels, both for the enrichment of the general public and for the professional advancement of the talented. Founded in 1944, NATS is the largest association of teachers of singing in the world and boasts more than 6,500 members in the United States, Canada and more than 25 other countries around the world.

 

The UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts has achieved awards and national and international recognition for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as for music education, composition, theory and music history.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Art in Unlikely Places: Student Entrepreneurs Impacting Community through the Arts

Mon, 04/27/2015 - 5:10pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 28, 2015) — The University of Kentucky College of Fine Arts is paving a new frontier by offering an experience to college kids that brings new meaning to the hands-on learning environment. 

 

In the spring of 2014, the Arts Administration Program at UK launched a new course and initiative called Art in Unlikely Places. The goal of Art in Unlikely Places is driven by a belief that creativity is the seed of hope. The initiative connects inspiring artists to those most in need of the transformative powers of the arts. The students' vision is that this organization will deliver the work of inspiring artists to the ailing, the impoverished, and the distraught, sharing beauty with those whose life-circumstances might otherwise prevent them from discovering the hope that is found in the artistic moment. 

 

Art in Unlikely Places, in its second year, is a registered student organization at UK. The organization elects officers within the class based on a typical nonprofit organizational structure. From the beginning of the semester the students are challenged to develop an idea into a fully realized initiative that fulfills the mission of the organization.

 

Students participating in Art in Unlikely Places this semester have developed a new idea to impact the Lexington community through the power of the arts. "A Beautiful Life: Through the Eyes of a Child" introduces children in need to the arts by providing them an opportunity to express themselves in creative ways. They have partnered this year with Greenhouse 17, a refuge for children who have been witness to domestic violence, and The Kidz Club, where children with medical needs are provided special attention with academic and social interaction.

 

Art in Unlikely Places held workshops with 30 children for the organizations, prompting participants to create artworks that expressed their inner feelings, hopes and dreams. All were asked to draw what made life beautiful to them. Music therapists from Evolve joined the partnership with the students during the workshops where children participated in songs and games.

 

Lending his talents to "A Beautiful Life” is renowned artist, UK Professor Arturo Alonzo Sandoval. Sandoval, with the assistance of photographer Scott Walz, will incorporate images of the artworks the children created into four quilts and a digital collage. Two of the art quilts will be donated to the partner organizations and the remaining two have been sold to benefit the program. The original artworks by the kids at Greenhouse 17 and The Kidz Club along with the story of the Art in Unlikely Places students will be reproduced into a book.

 

For $30, arts patrons can purchase the book and receive an invitation to the Art in Unlikely Places finale. All Art in Unlikely places supporters will be invited to the unveiling celebration of the final artworks May 7, at the Lexington Art League. Light refreshments will be served accompanied by a musical guest appearance from the popular UK a cappella group, the acoUstiKats.

 

Proceeds from the event will allow Art in Unlikely Places to continue to send art workshops back to Greenhouse 17 and The Kidz Club. Funds will also insure that Art in Unlikely Places will continue to thrive and benefit the future students of the program.

 

Students have collaborated with local organizations and businesses like the UK College of Fine Arts, WRFL, Red Mango, T.G.I. Fridays and Bourbon and Toulouse to help them achieve their fundraising and marketing goals for the semester.

 

The class collectively feels that this style of instruction has been one of the most real and beneficial programs to their educational experience. The students of Art in Unlikely Places are led by Mark Rabideau, adjunct assistant professor and director of undergraduate studies in the Arts Administration Program.

 

Rabideau is a strong believer in the real life experiences this course structure offers. “I am willing to watch my students fail, but I am not prepared to watch them do something ordinary. I believe this class and these students are extraordinary,” Rabideau said.

 

For further information on this student project, visit Art in Unlikely Places at their GoFundMe website: www.gofundme.com/artinunlikelyplace. You can also find them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter at: www.facebook.com/artin.unlikelyplaces; www.twitter.com/ArtinUnlikely; and www.instagram.com/artinunlikelyplaces.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Art is in Bloom at the UK Art Museum

Thu, 04/23/2015 - 3:33pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 24, 2015) — Art In Bloom, the Art Museum at University of Kentucky's annual fundraiser, opens today, Friday, April 24, with floral designers interpreting works of art from the museum's permanent collection. Floral designs will be on display from noon-8 p.m. Friday, April 24, and from noon-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, April 25 and 26. Admission to see the floral designs is free.

 

This year's Art in Bloom festivities honor Kasia and Andre Pater. Since their move from Poland in 1988, Andre's art has focused on subjects including polo, racing, cattle, wildlife, foxhunting and Native Americans. Kasia has contributed to magazines including Kentucky Living and Kentucky Monthly, as well as published a book of poems, "Poste Restante."

In addition to the exhibition of floral designs, the Art in Bloom cocktail party will be presented 7:30-11:30 p.m. Saturday, April 25. The party will consist of art-inspired food, drinks, music and poetry. Food will be provided by local chefs including:
· Cole Arimes, of Coles;

· Renee Brewer, of Wine + Market;

· Seth Brewer and Carrie Arps, of Enoteca;

· Toa Green, of Crank & Boom Craft Ice Cream;

· Martine Holzman, of Martine's Pastries;

· Jonathan Lundy, of Coba Cocina;

· alumna Ouita Michel, of Holly Hill Inn;

· Johnny Shipley, of County Club;

· alumnus Dan Wu, a private chef who appeared on Fox's "Master Chef," and

· Nat Yuttayong, of Nat's.

 

Maker's Mark will provide signature cocktails and music will be performed by the Carlos Espinosa Trio, the UK String Quartet and singer-songwriter Carla Gover.

 

Art-inspired poetry by Julia Johnson, Maurice Manning, Erik Reece, Katerina Stoykova-Klemer and Frank X Walker will also be read at the event.

Tickets for the Art in Bloom Cocktail Party are $75 and are available at the door, online by visiting the museum's website at http://finearts.uky.edu/art-museum or by phone at 859-257-6218.

Art in Bloom 2015 is co-chaired by Renee Saunier Brewer, Seth Brewer, David Coomer and Dan Wu.

 

The mission of the Art Museum at UK, part of the UK College of Fine Arts, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of art to enhance the quality of life for people of Kentucky through collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting outstanding works of visual art from all cultures. Home to a collection of more than 4,500 objects including American and European paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and sculpture, the Art Museum at UK presents both special exhibitions and shows of work from its permanent collection.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

 

An Evening of Mozart Masterpieces

Wed, 04/22/2015 - 2:59pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 22, 2015) — In a grand collaboration with the University of Kentucky Choirs and the UK Symphony Orchestra, hundreds of performers from UK School of Music will take the Singletary Center for the Arts stage to perform works of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 24. The concert is free and open to the public.

 

The concert program will feature Mozart’s Requiem Mass in D minor under the direction of conductor of the UK Symphony Orchestra John Nardolillo and conductor of the UK Choirs Jefferson Johnson. The ensembles will also perform the composer’s “Overture to Le nozze di Figaro” and Symphony No. 38 in D Major “Prague.”

 

Prior to the concert, the Friends of the UK School of Music and the Art Museum at UK will host a pre-show reception at 6 p.m. in the museum.

 

Mozart was born into a musical family, educated by his father, Leopold, and paraded on tour throughout Europe as a musical prodigy on both the keyboard and violin. Ten years of travel fostered the growth of his compositional voice, which became one of the most influential in the history of western music.

 

The Requiem Mass was one of three major works that dominated the final months of Mozart’s life. The Mass was commissioned by Count Walsegg-Stuppach to honor his wife, who had died in February 1791. The story of the Requiem’s commissioning and conception were a point of intrigue from the moment of its first performance. The combination of Walsegg-Stuppach requesting the work in secret and Mozart’s death before its completion sowed the seeds of conjecture for years to come. At the time of Mozart’s death in December 1791, the manuscripts were handed over to a former student, Franz Xaver Sussmayr, who claimed to have composed the latter parts of the Requiem while completing the rest of Mozart’s sketches to create the Requiem we know today.

 

In addition to the gifted ensembles and conductors, the concert will showcase the vocal talents of UK Opera Theatre senior Jessica Bayne, of Christiansburg, Virginia; graduate student Holly Dodson, of Lexington; junior Matthew Pearce, of Union, Kentucky; and doctoral candidate André Campelo, of Goiânia, Brazil.

 

Founded in 1918, the UK Symphony Orchestra is regarded as one of the nation’s best college orchestras. The group is made up of undergraduate and graduate students from across the United States, Asia, South America and Europe. The orchestra regularly performs with world-renowned concert artists including Itzhak Perlman, Joshua Bell, Sarah Chang, Gil Shaham, Mark O’Connor, Lynn Harrell, Marvin Hamlisch, Lang Lang and Arlo Guthrie. The orchestra performs in the concert hall at the Singletary Center for the Arts, with UK Opera Theatre at the Lexington Opera House, and on tour, including concerts at Carnegie Hall in New York in 2007 and 2010, and the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. in 2009. In addition to live performances, UK's orchestra is one of the only collegiate orchestra programs to record with Naxos, the world’s largest classical music label.

 

The ensembles of the UK Choirs constitute one of the most active and vibrant collegiate choral programs in the country. UK's choral ensembles are 220 students strong, presenting more than 60 performances annually. The choirs are regularly invited to perform at prestigious national conferences including the American Choral Directors Association. They have also toured Europe extensively, offering a rich international educational experience for our students.

 

The UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts has achieved awards and national and international recognition for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as for music education, composition, theory and music history.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Theatre Ends 'Hair' Raising Season With Broadway Musical

Tue, 04/21/2015 - 3:44pm

 

 

Promotional video for "Hair" by UK Department of Theatre and Dance. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 22, 2015) — Don't miss the last four performances of the University of Kentucky Department of Theatre and Dance closing production, the popular Broadway musical "Hair," running through April 26, at the Guignol Theatre.

 

A rock musical, "Hair" follows the lives of politically active young people living the bohemian lifestyle in New York's East Village during the 1960s. Its cast of characters fights against the draft and Vietnam War, questions authority and advocates for freedom of expression. "Hair," written by James Rado and Gerome Ragni, originally premiered off Broadway in the New York Shakespeare Festival in 1967, found its way to Broadway in April 1968, and won a Tony and Drama Desk Award in 2009. Family of Ragni will be in attendance at the April 25th performance.

 

"Hair" takes the Guignol stage 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, April 23-25, and 2 p.m. Sunday, April 26. Tickets to "Hair" are $20 for general admission and $15 for UK students with a valid ID through the Singletary Center box office. To purchase tickets, contact the box office at 859-257-4929, visit online at www.scfatickets.com or purchase in person during operating hours.

 

The UK Department of Theatre and Dance at UK College of Fine Arts has played an active role in the performance scene in Central Kentucky for more than 100 years. Students in the program get hands-on training and one-on-one mentorship from the renowned professional theatre faculty. The liberal arts focus of their bachelor's degree program is coupled with ongoing career counseling to ensure a successful transition from campus to professional life. 

UK Ethnomusicologist Donna Kwon Selected for ACLS Fellowship

Thu, 04/16/2015 - 1:42pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 17 , 2015) — University of Kentucky Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology Donna Kwon has been selected as a recipient of a 2014-2015 American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Fellowship. Kwon's research is titled "Stepping in the Madang: Embodying Space and Place in Korean Drumming and Dance."

 

"Stepping in the Madang" addresses the spatialization of culture in Korean drumming and dance, centering on the concept of the “madang,” a cultural space that was revived in opposition to the Western stage in South Korea. While the madang can best be visualized as a village courtyard, it can also refer temporally to an occasion in time or socially to a sense of embodied communal participation. The thesis of this research contends that the participatory way of being that is cultivated in the madang counteracts the fossilization of tradition by bringing folk practices more fully into the embodied present, even if in an idealized fashion.

 

Kwon earned bachelor's degrees in piano performance and women's studies from Oberlin College and Conservatory, a master's degree in music and ethnomusicology from Wesleyan University and a doctoral degree in musicology and ethnomusicology from the University of California, Berkeley. She has served as an elected member of the Society for Ethnomusicology Council and is president of the Association for Korean Music Research.

 

Before coming to UK School of Music in 2008, Kwon taught at Lawrence University and Grinnell College and served as the William Randolph Hearst Fellow at Rhodes College, offering courses on Asian music, global and American popular music, world music, Korean percussion and musical places, spaces and scenes. She is the recipient of a Fulbright IIE fellowship, two grants from the Korea Foundation, the Distinguished Master's Thesis Award, and the Marnie Dilling Prize. Kwon presents papers regularly at the Society for Ethnomusicology conference on her research interest which include Korean music, East Asian and Asian American popular and creative music, issues of music and embodiment, gender and the body, space and place, music scenes and the workings of cultural politics. She is also the author of the book "Music in Korea: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture" that was published as part of the Global Music Series of Oxford University Press (2011).

 

Kwon was happily surprised with the ACLS Fellowship. "My first reaction was just utter disbelief. In fact, I was so convinced that I would be passed over that I completely missed the 'congratulations' in the subject line when opening the initial email from the ACLS Director of Fellowship Programs, Dr. Matthew Goldfeder. I am beyond ecstatic to be a recipient of this support in order to bring this research to fruition and really bring the book project to life. Beyond this, it is incredibly gratifying to know that my research spoke to specialists and non-specialists enough to be selected from the pool of applicants this year. As one of the few ethnomusicologists in the state of Kentucky, it’s easy to feel isolated and lose a sense of connection and perspective from others in the field so this award means that much more to me."

 

The ACLS, a private, nonprofit federation of 72 national scholarly organizations, is the preeminent representative of American scholarship in the humanities and related social sciences. This year ACLS made a total of 70 awards to faculty of all ranks and independent scholars too support research in the humanities and the humanistic social sciences.

 

"Fellows were chosen for their potential to create new knowledge resulting from investigations and reflections on cultures, texts and artifacts from across the globe and human history," Goldfeder said. "ACLS programs employs a rigorous multi-stage peer review process to ensure that humanities scholars themselves select those few fellows who exemplify the very best in their fields. The 70 fellows this year represent more than 50 colleges and universities and an array of human disciplines, including linguistics, religious studies, architectural history and geography."

 

ACLS Fellowships allow the scholars to spend six to 12 months on full-time researching and writing. The program is funded by the ACLS endowment, which has received contributions from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment of Humanities, the council's college and university associates, past fellows and friends of ACLS.

 

The UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts garnered national recognition for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, theory and music history.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Love/Hate Relationship With Gypsies and Gypsy Music Focus of Longyear Lecture

Tue, 04/14/2015 - 4:53pm

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2015) — The University of Kentucky School of Music will present a colloquium talk and workshop on Gypsy music by Carol Silverman as part of the Rey M. Longyear Colloquium Lecture Series. The talk is scheduled for 3:30 p.m. Friday, April 17, in the Niles Gallery located in the Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center. Silverman will also hold a Balkan singing workshop the following afternoon at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 18, in the Niles Gallery.

 

Carol Silverman is a professor of cultural anthropology and folklore at the University of Oregon. As part of the Longyear Lecture, she will present her research in a talk titled “Global Gypsy: Balkan Romani Music, Appropriation and Representation.”

 

In the last 20 years, the popularity of Balkan "Gypsy" music has exploded, becoming a staple at world music festivals and dance clubs in the United States and Western Europe. At the same time, thousands of Balkan Roma have emigrated westward due to deteriorating living conditions. Entrenched stereotypes of thievery have arisen amidst deportations and harassment. In this heightened atmosphere of xenophobia, Roma, as Europe’s largest minority and its quintessential “other,” face the paradox that they are revered for their music yet reviled as people. 

 

Balkan Gypsy music is simultaneously a commodity, a trope of multiculturalism, and a potent in-group symbol in cosmopolitan contexts. Focusing on clubs and festivals, this ethnographic presentation investigates the ramifications of the current scene for Romani performers and non-Romani musicians, producers, audiences and marketers.

 

Silverman has done research with Roma for over 25 years in Balkans, Western Europe and the U.S. Her work explores the intersection of politics, music, human rights, gender and state policy with a focus on issues of representation. A professional performer and teacher of Balkan music, she also works with the Voice of Roma

 

In addition to scores of articles in scholarly journals and edited volumes, Silverman published "Romani Routes: Cultural Politics and Balkan Music in Diaspora" (Oxford University Press, 2012), which won the Merriam Book Prize from the Society for Ethnomusicology. She is also the recipient of numerous prestigious fellowships including the John Simon Guggenheim and the American Council of Learned Societies Fellowships.

 

The UK School of Music, part of UK College of Fine Arts, has garnered national recognition for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, theory and music history.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu